Saturday, October 21, 2017

Frank A. Munsey's Copy of Dracula by Bram Stoker

American newspaper and magazine publisher Frank A. Munsey was lucky enough to receive a signed copy of Bram Stoker's 1897 novel Dracula inscribed by the author on the day of publication. The seller now offering this volume on eBay surmises, "Undoubtedly, Stoker presented the book to Munsey in an unsuccessful hope that Munsey would serialize Dracula in one of his magazines." Munsey created a number of popular ten-cent pulp magazines, discovering a brand new market. He was also something of a novelist himself. The book has been rebound and is currently listed at $52,000. Too rich for my—ahem!—blood.



Inscribed "Frank A. Munsey/from Bram Stoker/22-6-97"


Dracula title page
Has anyone heard of Stoker's four earlier books?





Bram Stoker
eBay Listing as of October 21, 2017

Bram Stoker
eBay Item Description




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Bram Stoker

Signed,Books


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Friday, October 20, 2017

Dracula: The Definitive Edition, Signed and Numbered by Edward Gorey

Dracula:  The Definitive Edition of the Bram Stoker classic was published in 1996 with an introduction and appendices by Marvin Kaye and with illustrations by Edward Gorey. The deluxe edition and lithograph are each signed and numbered by the artist. The edition is limited to 750 numbered copies and 26 lettered copies. Copy #638 was listed on Abe Books on August 8 and subsequently sold.







Bram Stoker
Abe Books Listing Beginning August 8, 2017

Note that the synopsis and review refer to two other very different editions of Dracula
Sold

Note:  Your blogger is batty for scans and photographs of uniquely-signed books and original art by Edward Gorey.


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Edward Gorey

Bram Stoker

Signed, Limited Editions


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Thursday, October 19, 2017

Folon in Japan

A unique copy of Jean-Michel Folon's Odakyu Grand Gallery catalogue from a Tokyo art exhibit was inscribed in June of 1985 to Eiichi Yamazaki, who presumably helped to organize the show. Yet it was never given to him. Instead, Folon brought the exhibition catalogue back to France along with the intended recipient's business card. Go figure.



Jean-Michel Folon
Abe Books Listing as of October 9, 2017. Subsequently sold.




Note:  Your humble blogger seeks scans and photographs of uniquely-signed books and original art by Jean-Michel Folon.


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Jean-Michel Folon


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Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Leo Cullum: The Father of the Bride of Frankenstein

I am by no means a fan of the practice of slabbing original autographs and even cartoons. I am certainly okay with using protective slabs to preserve coins, for example, and some collectible paper such as currency, stamps, and even comic books (although it's a shame not to be able to read them). So what then do I recommend when a cartoonist such as Leo Cullum embellishes and autographs a one dollar bill? Well, the cartoon should takes precedence over the paper it's drawn on, of course, so therefore I do not favor slabbing; indeed I prefer framing. Paper money collectors enthralled by the uniqueness of the item are free to disagree with me.

Leo Cullum, The Father of the Bride of Frankenstein

Now you know why they're called greenbacks.

Leo Cullum
EBay Listing Ended June 27, 2015

Leo Cullum
EBay Item Description

Leo Cullum
EBay Bid History
A seven-day auction is decided in the final two seconds





Note:  Your friendly blogger seeks scans and photographs of all manner of original art by Leo Cullum in all media. Check your wallet.


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Leo Cullum


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Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Jump Shot: Arthur Getz Original New Yorker Cover Art

The basketball season gets underway today. It's more than fifty years since Arthur Getz's New Yorker cover was published depicting a jump shot from nearly mid-court—there was no three-point line then. It's ten years since the original art was offered for sale at an Illustration House auction. No buyer was found.
Arthur Getz
Original art
The New Yorker, February 5, 1966
Illustration House
June 2, 2007
Lot 83

http://www.findartinfo.com/english/list-prices-by-artist/7651/arthur-kimmel-getz.html
Arthur Getz
The New Yorker, February 5, 1966


Note:  Desperately seeking original art by Arthur Getz for inclusion on the blog. And Susan.

Arthur Getz's website may be found at getzart.com.


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Arthur Getz


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Monday, October 16, 2017

My Entry in The New Yorker Cartoon Caption Contest #588

I have a hunch my entry in The New Yorker Cartoon Caption Contest #588 for October 16, 2017 isn't going to rise to the level of the bell tower. The drawing is by David Borchart.

"I've been trying to ring you all morning."



Note:  Last week cartoonist Peter Kuper took us to an art gallery. My caption misread all the signs. Endear yourself to Contest #587.

Hmm. Does the name David Borchart ring  a bell?

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Sunday, October 15, 2017

Peter Arno's Side-Show for August 1937

It'a hard to think of a cartoonist who got more mileage than Peter Arno did simply from observing the mutual attraction of the sexes. But here we are in the August 1937 issue of College Humor and our boy is at it again...

The full page College Humor cartoon of a motorcycle cop confronting an unseen couple calls to mind a famous gag Arno did for the New Yorker of December 7, 1929. In that cartoon a couple approach a police officer on a motorcycle. The man carries a car seat cushion and says, "We want to report a stolen car." The reader is left to surmise what the couple has been doing outdoors with just the seat cushion. This cartoon was assigned to Arno by Harold Ross, the magazine's founding editor, who nevertheless was later rumored not to have gotten the joke. Supposedly Ross believed any car part would have been equally as funny as the car seat. Arno seems confident, though, that the College Humor crowd will understand a similar scenario without any further need for explanation.

"We want to report a stolen car."
Peter Arno
The New Yorker, December 7, 1929, page 31



"Ready or not—I'm gonna give you a ticket!"
Peter Arno
College Humor, Vol. 5, No. 4, August 1937, page 10
Scanned by Dick Buchanan

The two remaining half-page gags are set at a nudist colony and on board a cruise ship. Arno sets each one up so the knowing reader can feel more perceptive than the naive speaker. Vive la différence.

"And what do you do for excitement?" [above]
"Herbert—who is that man daughter is talking to?" [below]
Peter Arno
College Humor, Vol. 5, No. 4, August 1937, page 11
Scanned by Dick Buchanan


Note:  For more on Harold Ross and whether he did or didn't understand Arno's stolen car gag, see Dale Kramer's Ross and The New Yorker, 1952, pages 201-202; James Thurber's The Years with Ross, 1957, page 255; Brendan Gill's Here at the New Yorker, 1975, page 33; and Michael Maslin's Peter Arno: The Mad, Mad World of The New Yorker's Greatest Cartoonist, 2016, pages 64-65. Thurber and Gill treat the story as fact; Kramer and Maslin are more circumspect.

Thanks again to Dick Buchanan for using his world class scanning skills to obtain such gorgeous results. Dick contributes regularly to Mike Lynch Cartoons, most recently a captionless piece entitled "'Captions? Who Needs 'Em?' Wordless Gag Cartoons 1947 – 1970."

You too can make scans for Attempted Bloggery. Together we can make obscure published art by Peter Arno and other New Yorker artists the order of the day.


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Peter Arno

Harold Ross

College Humor

Dick Buchanan

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Saturday, October 14, 2017

Gregory d'Alessio in College Humor, August 1937

Gregory d'Alessio's cartoon in the August 1937 issue of College Humor has no caption. What it does have is a mobster with what passes for a romantic streak. You might say he's all fired up.

Gregory d'Alessio
College Humor, Vol. 5, No. 4, August 1937, page 32


Note:  Once again my thanks go to Dick Buchanan for putting his superb scanning skills to such good use. He contributes regularly to Mike Lynch Cartoons, most recently a mute piece called "'Captions? Who Needs 'Em?' Wordless Gag Cartoons 1947 – 1970."

Send a love letter to the memory of Gregory d'Alessio. Readers are encouraged to contribute scans or photos of original art or published cartoons by the artist.

Mr. d'Alessio's obituary in the New York Times may be seen here.


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Gregory d'Alessio

College Humor

Dick Buchanan

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Friday, October 13, 2017

Buford Tune in College Humor, August 1937

What a cartoon Buford Tune has in the August 1937 number of College Humor! This long-forgotten gem is a technically-plausible rendering of an absolutely preposterous pun, with a scantily-clad young woman (who doesn't seem to need the product she ordered) thrown in for good measure. Come on, what more do you want?

"Don't argue with me—I ordered a girdle!"
Buford Tune
College Humor, Vol. 5, No. 4, August 1937, page 38
Scanned by Dick Buchanan

Note:  Once again my thanks go to Dick Buchanan for putting his superb scanning skills to such good use. He contributes regularly to Mike Lynch Cartoons, most recently a silent piece called "'Captions? Who Needs 'Em?' Wordless Gag Cartoons 1947 – 1970."

Help put all this in perspective. Readers are welcome to contribute scans or photos of published rarities or original art by Buford Tune.

For biographical info, check out Ink-Slinger Profiles by Alex Jay: Buford Tune which appeared on October 20, 2014 in A Stripper's Guide.

Buford Tune published one and only one cartoon in The New Yorker, qualifying him as a member Ink Spill's One Club.


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Buford Tune

College Humor

Dick Buchanan

Puns

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Thursday, October 12, 2017

William Von Riegen in College Humor, August 1937

A cartoon by William Von Riegen from the August 1937 issue of College Humor imagines just what can happen when signs are interpreted a little too earnestly.

"I'm going to be married."
William Von Riegen
College Humor, Vol. 5, No. 4, August 1937, page 61
Scanned by Dick Buchanan


Note:  My thanks to Dick Buchanan for putting his superb scanning skills to work for the greater good. He contributes regularly to Mike Lynch Cartoons, most recently a fine piece on Orlando Busino.

Information please? Industrious readers who would like to contribute scans or photos of published rarities or original art by William Von Riegen are welcome. Me, I can barely turn my scanner on.

Biographical notes on the artist from artprice.com may be found here.

Von Riegen's figure drawings from Gene Byrnes's Complete Guide to Cartooning may be seen here.

A very brief biographical line on Von Riegen appears on the The New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z of Ink Spill.


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William Von Riegen

College Humor

Dick Buchanan

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