Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Syd Hoff in College Humor, July 1936

Syd Hoff had no fewer than five cartoons published in the July 1936 issue of College Humor. Two of them involve a butler which most Depression-Era college students probably didn't have much experience with. Two involve a couple kissing and petting in a car, which most college students either knew a lot about or pretended they did. But the first and maybe the most memorable of the cartoons involves an unwelcome and unconventional intruder.


"Papa—I think there's a burglar in the house!"
Syd Hoff
College Humor, Vol. 2, No. 2, July 1936, page 36

"Throw him out!"
Syd Hoff
College Humor, Vol. 2, No. 2, July 1936, page 39



"Don't rush yourselves—I got all night."
Syd Hoff
College Humor, Vol. 2, No. 2, July 1936, page 40



"Mind if I try to pick up somebody for myself?"
Syd Hoff
College Humor, Vol. 2, No. 2, July 1936, page 43

"Now eat that spinach before I get real mad!"
Syd Hoff
College Humor, Vol. 2, No. 2, July 1936
page 48



With this last cartoon, one wonders whether Hoff was thinking of Carl Rose's famous spinach cartoon from The New Yorker in 1928, with a caption penned by E. B. White:
"It's broccoli, dear."
"I say it's spinach, and I say the hell with it."
Carl Rose
The New Yorker, December 8, 1928, page 27





Note:  It was back in the spring of 2016 in the Butler Library that I photographed this five-bagger by Syd Hoff in a copy of the July 1936 number of College Humor. Unfortunately, I never got the chance to look at more than 99 percent of the 5,600 periodicals now housed in the Steven Boss humor magazine collection. This invaluable collection is stored in the Rare Book and Manuscript Library of Columbia University and is accessible to the general public, even me. For information, contact Curator for Comics and Cartoons Karen Green and tell her you'd like to follow in my footsteps, albeit without the stomping about the library that I promised I wouldn't do anymore.

It should be clear by now that there's quite a treasure trove of work by Syd Hoff out there just waiting to be discovered, much of it hidden away in obscure places. Attempted Bloggery is eager to receive scans or photographs from readers of original art by Hoff as well as published gag cartoons, illustrations, advertisements, and whatnot, especially the whatnot. Finally, anyone who knows the whereabouts of Hoff's large Café Society mural, please give a holler.


External Links:

Syd Hoff, Cartoonist & Author

Syd Hoff's Wikipedia Entry

Syd Hoff on Ink Spill

Christopher Wheeler's Cartoon(ist) Gallery on Syd Hoff 

Syd Hoff in the collection of Syracuse University

Syd Hoff on Hairy Green Eyeball




Quick Links to the Attempted Bloggery Archives:

Syd Hoff


Attempted Bloggery supports net neutrality.


02438

Monday, January 22, 2018

My Entry in the New Yorker Cartoon Caption Contest #601

Thanks for chasing down my entry in the New Yorker Cartoon Caption Contest #601 for January 22, 2018. The drawing is by Amy Hwang.
"What does that mean, convergent evolution?"




These weren't any good either:
"What was the name of that Texas ranger?"
"Who are you calling spineless."
"Is that what you call Snowflake?"
"It's got me on pins and needles."
"You mean this is the Saguaro Run?"
"Stop saying 'not a snowball's chance in hell.'" 



Note:  Last week, Drew Panckeri showed us man's best friend in space. My caption lacked gravity. If you like nice round numbers, you'll love Contest #600.


Amy Hwang has managed to avoid mention on Attempted Bloggery before today. Her run of good luck is over.


02437

Sunday, January 21, 2018

Syd Hoff: Marriage Barrage

Ready, aim...
"Mind if I join you? He's my husband."
Syd Hoff
True, January 1948. page 110

Scan by Dick Buchanan


When I first saw this Syd Hoff cartoon from the January 1948 issue of True, I thought, that's not funny. I mean, it's juvenile. It's plain silly. It infantilizes the battle of the sexes. So, naturally, I asked my wife for her opinion. She informed me that the cartoon was "cute" and I was in the wrong. I suppose there's a first time for everything.

Note how the man stands out because of his dark attire against the snow. As we read the gag from left to right, we take in first the woman, the children, and the snowballs before we get to him, the target. He is already the "target" and focal point of the composition. The perspective lines of the wall point to him, and so do multiple lines from other figures' arms, from their feet, even from the brim of one child's hat, also from the angle of the roof and from the curve of the tree branches and the cloud. Note too how the sight lines from the eyes of the children point to the woman on the left and then to the man on the right. Thus Hoff's composition expertly establishes a flow from left to right. Finally, it's worth recalling that in 1948 no one gave a second thought to the commonplace use of hats, a cigar, and even a luxurious mink coat. 
"Mind if I join you? He's my husband."
Syd Hoff
True, January 1948. page 110

Scan by Dick Buchanan



Note:  I am ever obliged to Dick Buchanan for pummeling us with this beautiful scan. Dick keeps and maintains the legendary Dick Buchanan Cartoon Clip Files and he contributes regularly to Mike Lynch Cartoons, most recently a post entitled, "From the Dick Buchanan Files: William Steig Gag Cartoons 1946 - 1965." Great gags all around.

There's a lot of work by Syd Hoff out there. Attempted Bloggery
 is eager to see your scans or photographs of original art by the artist as well as published obscurities (gag cartoons, illustrations, advertisements, and recurring features) not readily available online. And if you should somehow happen to know the whereabouts of Hoff's Café Society mural, get in touch immediately.


External Links:

Syd Hoff, Cartoonist & Author

Ink Spill on Syd Hoff

Christopher Wheeler's Cartoon(ist) Gallery on Syd Hoff 



Quick Links to the Attempted Bloggery Archives:

Syd Hoff


Attempted Bloggery supports net neutrality.



02436

Saturday, January 20, 2018

Syd Hoff: People You Could Murder


The feature is called People You Could Murder. You have the means. You have the motive. You have the opportunity. And no jury would convict. Allow cartoonist and defense counsel Syd Hoff to illustrate:

Syd Hoff
 People You Could Murder
The American Magazine, September 1946, page 75





Note:  I am much obliged to Dick Buchanan for providing us with this unpremeditated scan. Dick's ready-made alibi, not that he needs one, is that he's hard at work scanning the storied Dick Buchanan Cartoon Clip Files. When he's not doing that, he contributes regularly to Mike Lynch Cartoons, most recently a post entitled, "From the Dick Buchanan Files: William Steig Gag Cartoons 1946 - 1965." That's my story and I'm sticking to it.

Doing forty to life? Even if you aren't, you probably still have enough time to brush up on cartoonist Syd Hoff. Visit the Syd Hoff website here including The American Magazine page here, Ink Spill here, or Christopher Wheeler's Cartoon(ist) Gallery here. Syd Hoff was just turning 34 when this guilty little pleasure was published.

Dick believes People You Could Murder was a recurring series that may have appeared in The American Magazine throughout 1946. I have no independent recollection, but I do know there's a lot more fine work out there. Attempted Bloggery
 is ready to pass judgment on your scans or photos of original art by Syd Hoff as well as published rarities (gag cartoons, illustrations, advertisements, and recurring features) not otherwise available to law-abiding citizens. Needless to say, other installments of People You Could Murder would be welcomed, no questions asked.



Quick Links to the Attempted Bloggery Archives:

Syd Hoff


Attempted Bloggery supports net neutrality.


02435

Friday, January 19, 2018

Syd Hoff: Count Ten


Pins and needles, needles and pins, a happy man is a man that grins.
—"The Honeymooners"
Season 1, Episode 24, 1956


Have a seat. Take a deep breath. Relax. Read.

Syd Hoff
Count Ten

The American Magazine,
Vacation Issue 1942, page 103

Scan by Dick Buchanan


Note:  My thanks are given once again to Dick Buchanan for providing us with this soothing scan. Dick avidly maintains the legendary Dick Buchanan Cartoon Clip Files and he regularly contributes to Mike Lynch Cartoons, most recently a superb post entitled, "From the Dick Buchanan Files: William Steig Gag Cartoons 1946 - 1965." You simply can't do better than that.

Cartoonist Syd Hoff was a mere 29 years old when this little Count Ten gem was published. Sit back and learn more about Syd Hoff on the Syd Hoff website here, on Ink Spill here, and on Christopher Wheeler's Cartoon(ist) Gallery here.

Count Ten must have been a series. Surely there's a lot more out there. Attempted Bloggery
 eagerly awaits your scans or photographs of original art by Syd Hoff as well as published rarities (gag cartoons, illustrations, advertisements, and what-have-you) not otherwise available online. Other installments of Count Ten, if there are any, are needed pronto. I'm waiting, people.



Quick Links to the Attempted Bloggery Archives:

Syd Hoff


Attempted Bloggery supports net neutrality.



02434

Thursday, January 18, 2018

Syd Hoff: Trouble is Brewing

In the October 1945 issue of True, Staff Sergeant George Ammerman drily asks what happens when American armed forces find themselves stationed in remote corners of the world lacking appropriate alcohol provisions. It turns out the American soldier is capable of great resourcefulness in addressing such a critical shortage, no doubt putting the soldiers of other nations to shame. Syd Hoff provides two thirst-quenching illustrations.


Syd Hoff
"Trouble is Brewing" by S/ Sgt. George Ammerman
True, October 1945, page 77
Scan by Dick Buchanan


Note:  My thanks to Dick Buchanan for providing us with this scan. Dick maintains the legendary Dick Buchanan Cartoon Clip Files and he regularly contributes to Mike Lynch Cartoons, most recently a superb post entitled, "From the Dick Buchanan Files: William Steig Gag Cartoons 1946 - 1965." It's not to be missed.

Learn more about the talented Syd Hoff on the Syd Hoff website here, on Ink Spill here, and on Christopher Wheeler's Cartoon(ist) Gallery
here. 
Attempted Bloggery
 continues to seek scans or photographs of original art by Syd Hoff and published rarities (gag cartoons, illustrations, and advertisements) not readily available online.

Cheers!



Quick Links to the Attempted Bloggery Archives:
Syd Hoff


Attempted Bloggery supports net neutrality.



02433

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Syd Hoff for BarcaLounger

For a 1950 BarcaLounger ad that appeared on a full page in Life magazine, cartoonist Syd Hoff created a nine-panel gag cartoon that not only makes the case for having a BarcaLounger at home, it strongly suggests a couple might need to have two. The copy writer inserted a standard sales pitch below each trio of panels, but that takes a back seat to what we learn from the cartoon. Syd Hoff is the master salesman here.


Life Magazine, 1950





Note:  This ad appeared in Life during the year 1950, according to the eBay listing from which it was taken. Does anyone happen to know in which issue?

More advertisements by the talented Syd Hoff are on the Syd Hoff website here (including a lower-resolution scan of this BarcaLounger ad) and on Ink Spill here.


Attempted Bloggery seeks scans or photographs of original art by Syd Hoff and published obscurities (cartoons, illustrations, and advertisements) not readily found on the internet.




Quick Links to the Attempted Bloggery Archives:

Syd Hoff



Attempted Bloggery supports net neutrality.

02432

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

A Syd Hoff Salute

If Peter Arno was The New Yorker's quintessential elite Manhattan cartoonist, Syd Hoff was the cartoonist who best represented the working-class sensibilities of the Bronx. Back in the day, my own family members were New Yorkers born and bred in the Bronx, and so it's fitting that today Attempted Bloggery begins a long-overdue salute to the great Syd Hoff. But first let's have him give us a salute in an original drawing right out of the pages of a personally-inscribed copy of his 1944 collection Feeling No Pain. This is how a salute is done in the Bronx, at least without the Cheer.

Feeling No Pain, 1944
Inscribed "April 1945
Very best wishes
and greetings to
my good friends
the Tafts
from
Syd Hoff"
























Syd Hoff
eBay Listing Ended November 10, 2015


Syd Hoff
eBay Item Description


eBay Bid History


Feeling No Pain, 1944
Inscribed "April 1945
Very best wishes
and greetings to
my good friends
the Tafts
from
Syd Hoff"



Note:  Be sure to catch up on your reading about Syd Hoff 
on the Syd Hoff website here and on Ink Spill here.

Attempted Bloggery seeks scans or photos of original art by Syd Hoff as well as published rarities.




Quick Links to the Attempted Bloggery Archives:

Syd Hoff of the Bronx



Attempted Bloggery suports net neutrality.

02431

Monday, January 15, 2018

My Entry in The New Yorker Cartoon Caption Contest #600

Defy gravity with my entry in The New Yorker Cartoon Caption Contest #600 for January 15, 2018. The drawing is by Drew Panckeri.


"Whose turn is it to take him for a spacewalk?"



January 22, 2018 Update:  The Finalists




Note:  Last week, cartoonist Michael Maslin's caveman cartoon had some bite to it, but my caption proved toothless. Travel way back in time to Contest #599.


Drew Panckeri is new to this blog. There's a first time for everything, Drew.


Attempted Bloggery supports net neutrality.



02430

Sunday, January 14, 2018

Carl Rose: Shake Well Before Using

In October we were treated to a single page of interesting book illustrations on various literary subjects by Carl Rose. At that time the identity of the book for which they were created was unknown. Now the owner of these illustrations has returned and provided us with no fewer than fourteen scans of the sheets each containing a grouping of illustrations. Happily, this more complete set allows us to identify the book they were created for as Shake Well Before Using, a collection of pieces classified as "Mostly Humorous" by Bennett Cerf published in 1948. The name of the book appears at the top of some of the chapter heading illustrations.

To recap the history from the previous blog post, these original illustrations were obtained at "an auction for the benefit of the Democratic Party in Norwalk, Connecticut in the late 1960’s. Mr. Rose, a resident of Rowayton, CT, and apparent party supporter, donated them for the auction." A few examples of printed illustrations from the book are here shown below the sheet on which the original drawings appear. The owner estimates that the pages shown here contain 79 of the approximately 108 illustrations which appear in the book.


Section 1: "The Front Page"
Bennett Cerf, Shake Well Before Using, 1948, pages viii-1





















Section 11: "Radio"
Bennett Cerf, Shake Well Before Using, 1948, pages 250-251




The book:
Shake Well Before Using (1948) by Bennett Cerf
Illustrated by Carl Rose


Shake Well Before Using (1948)
Title page
Shake Well Before Using (1948)
Contents
Image added January 15, 2018



Note:
  As always, Attempted Bloggery seeks to publicize original art by Carl Rose. Original book illustrations, cartoons, and other works are welcome.




Quick Links to the Attempted Bloggery Archives:

Carl Rose


Attempted Bloggery supports net neutrality.

02429